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Yesterday

Yesterday

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As Missouri’s oldest permanent European settlement, the Village of Ste. Geneviève was settled by French Canadians around 1735 on the west bank of the Mississippi River.

History is Just the Beginning in Ste. Geneviève’s National Registered Historic District, offering visitors an unparalleled glimpse into its colonial past and more...

Historic Houses

Green Tree 2022

Beauvais-Amoureux House NPS Site

Built around 1792 by Jean-Baptiste St. Gemme Beauvais, the Beauvais-Amoureux Historic House overlooks Ste. Geneviève’s communal agricultural fields, le Grand Champ.

Its upright cedar log walls are…

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Bolduc & LeMeilleur Houses

The Bolduc House is a National Historic Landmark and is restored back to the way it was in the 1790s. The Colonial furnishings in this vertical log structure demonstrate how…

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Felix Vallé House State Historic Site

Travel back to Missouri’s early French roots at Felix Vallé House State Historic Site. The American-Federal style Vallé house was built in 1818 and today is furnished in the…

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Green Tree Tavern NPS Site

The Green Tree Tavern is the oldest verified vertical log building in Ste. Geneviève. Officially dated to 1790 by dendrochronology studies, this “poteau sur sole” (post on sill) vertical…

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Guibourd-Vallé House

The Guibourd-Vallé House was constructed for Jacques Guibourd in 1806 in the “poteaux-sur-sole” style with vertical, hand-hewn log walls and a double-pitched roof. This important National Register site is…

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Hands-On History at the Linden House

The Linden House features fun and educational French Colonial Activities for kids. Visit and experience colonial crafts and skills by “shopping” in our vintage store. Learn about history and…

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Jean Baptiste Valle NPS Site

The Jean-Baptiste Vallé House is a large and imposing example of the “poteaux-sure-solle” (post on sill) construction. In the 1850s and 1860s, subsequent owners of the house remodeled it to…

Read More

Beauvais-Amoureux House NPS Site

Built around 1792 by Jean-Baptiste St. Gemme Beauvais, the Beauvais-Amoureux Historic House overlooks Ste. Geneviève’s communal agricultural fields, le Grand Champ.

Its upright cedar log walls are…

Read More

Bolduc & LeMeilleur Houses

The Bolduc House is a National Historic Landmark and is restored back to the way it was in the 1790s. The Colonial furnishings in this vertical log structure demonstrate how…

Read More

Felix Vallé House State Historic Site

Travel back to Missouri’s early French roots at Felix Vallé House State Historic Site. The American-Federal style Vallé house was built in 1818 and today is furnished in the…

Read More

Green Tree Tavern NPS Site

The Green Tree Tavern is the oldest verified vertical log building in Ste. Geneviève. Officially dated to 1790 by dendrochronology studies, this “poteau sur sole” (post on sill) vertical…

Read More

Guibourd-Vallé House

The Guibourd-Vallé House was constructed for Jacques Guibourd in 1806 in the “poteaux-sur-sole” style with vertical, hand-hewn log walls and a double-pitched roof. This important National Register site is…

Read More

Hands-On History at the Linden House

The Linden House features fun and educational French Colonial Activities for kids. Visit and experience colonial crafts and skills by “shopping” in our vintage store. Learn about history and…

Read More

Jean Baptiste Valle NPS Site

The Jean-Baptiste Vallé House is a large and imposing example of the “poteaux-sure-solle” (post on sill) construction. In the 1850s and 1860s, subsequent owners of the house remodeled it to…

Read More
Ste. Geneviève Marble…

Ste. Geneviève Marble…

Protecting Our Founding Documents Did you know a part of Ste. Geneviève is being used today to protect the United States’ founding documents. Yes, it is! Ste. Geneviève is famous for stone particularly limestone, sandstone, and Ste. Geneviève marble. This marble has been used as decorative panels in buildings across America. Most notably, it is used to protect the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution at the National Archives in Washington DC. Visitors can view an example of the marble in the local post office.
Historic Roads…

Historic Roads…

The Roads Less Traveled Ste. Geneviève County is home to three historic roads.Three Notch Road: The earliest was the Three Notch Road that went from Ste. Geneviève to the lead mines at Mine la Motte.  The King’s Road: The second road was started in 1779 and became known as the King’s Road, or El Camino Real in Spanish, and eventually Kingshighway. There is a rural portion of this road north of downtown Ste. Geneviève that visitors can drive.  The Plank Road: The third historic highway was the 1852 Ste. Geneviève, Iron Mountain, and Plank Road. Constructed of wood, it was the longest such road built in Missouri and was used primarily to haul iron products from Iron Mountain west of present-day Farmington to Ste. Genevieve for transshipment on the river.  Visitors can drive a rural portion of Lime Kiln Road west of Ste. Geneviève.
Ste. Geneviève…

Ste. Geneviève…

The Patron Saint of Paris Did you know the “Ste” in Ste. Geneviève is the abbreviated form of Sainte because the town is named after a French female saint? Ste. Geneviève lived around 400 AD and was well-loved by the French. She is known as the patron saint of Paris since she is attributed to having saved Paris from Attila the Hun. The Church of Ste. Geneviève has a large statue of her above the front doors, a side altar dedicated to her, and a famous painting “The Vows of Ste. Geneviève” which is purported to have been given to the parish by King Louis XV. 
Art Colony…

Art Colony…

LIST OF ARTISTS ART COLONY Post Marked! A wall in the local post office was the canvas for a special mural commissioned by the federal government. As post offices were being built around the country in the early 1900s, 10% of the budget was directed towards art. Around the same time, Ste. Geneviève established its own Art Colony similar to the one in Providence, Rhode Island. Members included: Jessie Beard Rickly, Thomas Hart Benton, Aimee Schweig, Miriam McKinnie, Martyl Schweig Langsdorf, Sister Cassiana Marie, Joseph Meert, Bernard E. Peters, E. Oscar Thalinger, and Matthew E. Ziegler  Today, Ste. Geneviève has an Art Guild. There are also art galleries, art walks, opportunities to participate in Plein Air, “in the open air” painting, and a variety of art-related activities throughout the year.
Literary Influences… 

Literary Influences… 

The Walls Do Talk In Ste. Geneviève While not known as the birthplace of any literary figures, Ste. Geneviève has hosted its fair share of authors. The Green Tree Tavern was once the destination for writers passing through town. Henri Brackenridge, a 7-year-old boy from Pittsburgh was sent to Ste. Geneviève in 1793 for three years to learn French. He describes Ste. Geneviève in his book Recollections of Person and Places in the West and on his return to Ste. Geneviève in 1811, commented, “A sign on the other side of the Gabarie having caught my eye, I resolved to make for it – in former times private hospitality was the only dependence of the traveler.” Other authors who enjoyed the “private hospitality” of Ste. Geneviève were Thomas Ashe and John Maley.